Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Casual's Avatar
    Title
    Respected User
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    2,225

    Default Sizing Images for Web & Print

    This is something I find gets overlooked a lot by new photographers yet it is a critical function to presenting your work at it's best in whatever media you choose.

    I'm going to focus on Lightroom but the principals apply to any editing software. I'm also going to keep this pretty simple

    1. Intro: You have a final image edited to your liking and now it's time to share it with the world. The first step is to decide what you want to do with it, post it on Flickr, print a 5x7 or blow up a 24x36 metal print? Whatever you choose the first thing you will want to do is highlight the photo and hit export.

    2. Location: Select the location for the file. I like the "same as original", no subfolder, add to catalog, stack with original

    3. Naming: Whatever you prefer is fine. I name with specifics like File-24x36-Matt or File-800-Web. Something that helps me identify what the hell it is later on.

    4. Format: Unless you have a specific reason to use TIFF, always use jpeg. For Printing use quality 84% or jpeg 10, this is what all the labs want and the only visable difference in a higher quality file is file size. For Web I find quality of 76% is as high as you want to go and give best quality and file size, you can try lower but don't go over 76%. Use sRGB colorspace unless you fully understand this and want to use a different colorspace. If you don't know use sRGB. This is another topic that I can write on later.

    5. Image Sizing: It is important to understand the differences between web and print. Web uses pixels, print uses dimensions and pixels per inch. When you export for Web you choose how large the image is by setting the dimensions in pixels such as 800x600 Pixels. All computer monitors will display the image as 800x600, so the higher the resolution the monitor is the smaller the image will be. PPI has no impact on Web display. Prints are sized by choosing the dimensions such as 8"x10" as well as PPI which effects the overal quality of the image. Typically you want to print at 300PPI unless your doing some huge poster, billboard or something then it could range from 60 and up.

    So for Web select something between 600 and 1200 for the long edge so it's not too big, make sure it is sized to pixels and use 72 or 96PPI so people can't print them (not that it matters but that's just the standard selections for Web).

    For Print choose the dimensions you are printing to such as 8x10, make sure it is sized to inches and use 300PPI.

    6. Output Sharpening: This has nothing to do with the sharpening you added during PP, or clarity/de-fog, or noise reduction etc. This is specifically applying a sharpening algorithm to your image depending on the media and size of your final image. Choose the appropriate media (screen or print/paper type) and then usually standard will give a good result.

    7. Metadata: I like to minimize this but whatever, it's your image.

    8. Watermark: Again... it's your image.

    9. Post processing: Do nothing.


    I hope this is of use to some of you that may have never put much thought into it. Please comment if you have other tips and tricks, some of you may use the Print module which is fine too but I only use it if I'm printing at home on an inkjet. If you use Photoshop the workflow changes drastically but the key points remain the same.
    Last edited by Casual; 03-13-2013 at 09:25 AM.

  2. #2
    Omega Royale's Avatar
    Title
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Hialeah, Florida
    Posts
    93

    Default

    This is an informative thread. I'm actually getting more and more into photography little by little. Thanks for this, much appreciated.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------Wear Your Lifestyle-----------------------------------------------------------



    -----------------------------------------------------------------------VENNDK8.COM---------------------------------------------------------------

  3. #3
    sjknight413's Avatar
    Title
    Respected User
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Truro/Brighton, England
    Posts
    967

    Default

    Massively disagree with you on the bit where you say always use jpeg mate.
    It is always, ALWAYS better to save as a tiff. No labs I have ever come across specifically want jpegs, they will have a tiff or PDF workflow.

  4. #4
    Omega Royale's Avatar
    Title
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Hialeah, Florida
    Posts
    93

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sjknight413 View Post
    Massively disagree with you on the bit where you say always use jpeg mate.
    It is always, ALWAYS better to save as a tiff. No labs I have ever come across specifically want jpegs, they will have a tiff or PDF workflow.
    What about .png? How would that work? Or does it still have loss of data as well?
    -------------------------------------------------------------------Wear Your Lifestyle-----------------------------------------------------------



    -----------------------------------------------------------------------VENNDK8.COM---------------------------------------------------------------

  5. #5
    Casual's Avatar
    Title
    Respected User
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    2,225

    Default

    What professional print lab asks specifically for tiff or pdf? Maybe if your printing brochures on a press, but not photographic prints.

    If you are printing photographic prints they all prefer jpegs at 84%. I've dealt with many across North America. They do not want tiffs because it requires way too much bandwidth to have all their clients sending them files that large to gain nothing in print quality.

    *Note, I'm not saying they won't accept tiff either, lots will, I'm saying they prefer jpeg and theres no need to muddy the waters here, get a simple jpeg workflow going and save yourself a lot of bother.

    Also need to mention. I'm talking about exporting a jpeg from Lightroom, the original file will still be raw, tiff or psd depending on your workflow. Lightroom is non destructive. Once your finished editing you export to jpeg or in photoshop save a copy as jpeg.


    Png files are more specific use, great for web logos or anytime you need an opaque background, they were designed for use on web not for print.
    Last edited by Casual; 03-22-2013 at 06:23 AM.

  6. #6

    Title
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2022
    Posts
    1

    Default

    rearrange pdf converter is a tool that can help you to re-arrange pages in the pdf files. After downloading the free application, you can find it easy to use. You can organize pdf the desired pdf document, and make some rearrangements, such as turning two pages into one or into four, splitting multiple pages into two separate ones, as well as many other options.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •