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  1. #1

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    Default AnimeYuuki's Basic Photography Guide, along with a flash tutorial by Brad

    Ok, seeing as the photography forum is getting a lot more hits and threads, I thought I'd make an easy to follow begginers camera guide with two sections, one for people using Digital Point and Shoot cameras, and the other for people using Film Operated Cameras. Then I will be ending the lesson with a few techniques you can use.



    Digital Point and Shoot Cameras


    Shutter Speed -
    The question we get most often here from begginers is "How do I increase my shutter speed on a _________ digital camera?"

    The answer to this is simple. If your digital camera has some sort of Tv (shutter priority) mode.
    Change your camera to Tv mode. Using your selection system (for instance, mine has a four arrow selection pad.)
    If your camera doesnt' have a Tv mode, you're screwed and should probably kill yourself now.


    Aperture -
    If you set your shutter speed too high, your photo will come out dark. This is because your camera substituted aperature so you could have a high shutter speed. You can solve this problem by going into Av mode on your camera. The same deal as Tv mode, but its about letting light into your lens.

    Inside every camera, there is an opening that regulates, again, how much light is allowed to reach the sensor. For most cameras (Except pinhole cameras), this is adjustable, either by the camera or manually by you. As an aperature gets smaller, refferred to as stopping down, it does two things. First, it lets in less light, and also creates more depth of field, which I will explain shortly. Vise versa, when it gets bigger, called opening up, it lets in more light and creates a shallower depth of field. The smaller the F number, the wider the aperature is. The larger the F number, the smaller the aperature is.

    Last Paragraph By Skatephotographer


    Ok, thats pretty much the basics that you wanna know if you're starting out with a point and shoot.

    35mm Film Cameras and SLR's

    Shutterspeed and Aperture
    See "Digital Point and Shoot" section.

    Types of Film
    Film you use is really a preference thing. You can use print film, which creates a negative. This is the film that you'd buy at Walmart or whatever, its pretty standard. Then there is slide film, which creates a positive. A positive is the exact opposite of a negative, all the colours appear as they were when you took the photo.

    Film ISO and ASA
    Note, the same principles do not apply for Digital SLR's.

    First off, a little trivia. In America, the term ISO is only used for Digital Cameras, the film equivilent is known as ASA. Everywhere else, its known as ISO. Crazy Americans...

    ISO is how sensitive your film is to light. Usually, you'll only find 100-3200 ISO film. If you have 100 ISO film, you won't be able to set your camera to extremely high shutter speeds because your film isn't very sensitive to light, and needs to be exposed to light longer to get a properly exposed picture. If you use 1600 ISO film, you can use very high shutter speeds because your film is very sensitive to light, and shouldn't be exposed to light for very long.

    If you've used different kinds of ISO film, you will realise that you get a different amount of film grain. You get less if your film is less sensitive to light. You get more if it is very sensitive.

    Maximum Aperature
    In another thread this was brought up, so I thought I would put it here. On every lens, there is a max aperature. A fast lens, such as an F/2.8, can open up to F/2.8, making it better for low light conditions that an F/5.6, which is 2 stops slower. The faster the lens, generally the more expensive and better lens. On consumer-grade zoom lenses, they have a max aperature range. A max aperature range such as F/3.5 - F/5.6 means that at the lenses widest focal length, it can open up to F/3.5, but through the zoom range that decreases, until it reaches its farthest focal length, where it can only open up to F/5.6.

    -Skatephotographer

    Flashes, by Chump Champ

    Then you've come to the right place. Here I shall outline certain flashes, and the placement of flashes.

    If you've clicked this thread, chances are you aren't nice with flashes. Therefore, I'm going to only recommend one flash. The Vivitar 285 Hv.This is the best bang for your buck, as the price and quality are unbeatable.

    Flash aperture=Lamefail. You want to become familiar with the 3 settings you will use. M, 1/2, 1/16th, and sometimes 1/32nd. So yeah, 4. Screw you.

    When you are outside, always use M. When it is getting darker, put it on 1/2 or 1/16 if it is completely dark. Use common sense here.

    Now for placement. I will use this for an example.



    For this picture, I had my flash at 1/2 (it was indoors), and placed to the slight right of the trick. The idea here is to get less flat lighting, and make the skater pop out. Again, common sense should tell you in each situation if you are only using one flash, what placement will help light your picture better.

    Now rimlights. Since I only have one flash at the moment, Connor (Skatephotographr) Explains this.

    A rimlight is a light used to make a skater, object, or portrait subject stand out from the background when a shallow depth of field cannot be used or doesn't seem appropriate. In general, you do not want just a rimlight in your photo, it is a mere add-on for other flashes. Often, a skater wearing dark clothes will blend heavily with the background, and the only way to seperate him is with a rimlight. For most cases, you want your "standard" flash placement, and the rimlight behind and low, behind and high, or behind and off to one directly. Putting it directly square in the back of the skater does not always work, as you need enough light around the rim, and directly behind doesn't always do that. Another thing to keep in mind is rimlights can *almost* never be too powerful. I always put rimlights on or near full power, as the more obvious the rimlight is often better.

    More from Joe - Using two flashes

    Mkay. Using two flashes. For this, you need to have two flashes, and a flash slave transmitter, and two recievers. I'm going to assume we all know what flash slaves are, but if not, i'll write something up about that too. Using two flashes is relatively simple, and allows you to stop down the ambient light, so your skater can pop out in the picture more. I'm going to walk you through how i set up one of my shots with two flashes.



    This shot was shot with a Nikon SB-800 at 1/2 power and 50mm Spread to the front of the skater, and a Nikon SB-25 at 1/4 and 35mm spread to the close left of the skater.

    When setting up for this shot, I was very cramped, and had two things I wanted to do. Use to full advantage his bright clothing, and make sure that the wall didn't get blown out. I failed in doing this. I was concrentrating too hard on making the skater pop out, and too little on thinking about shadows and exposure.


    I'm sorry guys, I got bored when writing this. I'll finish it later.
    Last edited by Yuuki; 10-27-2008 at 11:37 PM.

  2. #2
    hansster's Avatar
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    Thanks, that was really helpful. It was a really good guide.

  3. #3
    ZeroOrDie.'s Avatar
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    Yayyy thank youuu

  4. #4
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    Great job, but for the lines bit you should put Brenz's photo in.

    No I didn't learn anything from this, but it's still good anyway.
    Last edited by Skater_goth; 11-02-2007 at 03:49 PM.

  5. #5
    drowning_fish's Avatar
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    The F-stop is actually the ratio of the width of the opening with the lens' (I think?), so it actually does make sense that a bigger F stop is a smaller aperture
    loud black girls - wait what
    india songs
    "hell is other people" - the same guy who said "kissing a man without a mustache is like eating an egg without salt."
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  6. #6

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    so the ratio of f/1.4 being big and the ratio of f/22 is small makes sense?

  7. #7
    wolfgang's Avatar
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    Just an interesting piece of trivia.

    You get more grain when using light sensitive film because the silver halide particles that react to light are bigger.

  8. #8
    Skater_goth's Avatar
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    ^yes bigger, but is still very very tiny.

    But skilled photographers can still use 1600 and such ISO film and not get much grain.

  9. #9
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    12500 ISO film looks so good.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by brenz-brenz View Post
    12500 ISO film looks so good.
    Haha never even heard of it...
    ...it's been a while

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by skatetogetby View Post
    Haha never even heard of it...
    Thats because he is being sarcastic.

    I gave up on making these kinds of threads because A) no one reads them and B) They never get pinned, so they fall off the front page, and no one reads them.

  12. #12

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    Shoot! A

  13. #13

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    Shoot! and miss.
    I didn't think it was very good, you could improve it to be better though.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skatephotograpr View Post
    Thats because he is being sarcastic.
    Hell no.



    Shot by a regular contributer to one of the UK mags. ISO 12500.

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    Quote Originally Posted by brenz-brenz View Post
    Hell no.

    Shot by a regular contributer to one of the UK mags. ISO 12500.
    Thats absurd.

    Where can I get me some?

  16. #16
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    Should add a slave section

  17. #17
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    No idea. You could try pushing the ISO up, but I have no idea how to do it. Someone off the sidewalk forum pushed his from 400 to 1600. I think it might be as simple as lying to the camera where you tell it what ISO you have.

  18. #18
    ska8erofthe1tury's Avatar
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    Auussie people are awesome.


    Quote Originally Posted by Let Fire Fall View Post
    I want to be a Hooters girl.

    Or a Girls Gone Wild girl.
    Quote Originally Posted by JerseySucks View Post
    You are such a fucking retard. How much of a ''sex life'' does a girl around 15 years old have? She is probably still a virgin.
    ^O rly Jerseysucks?
    I am Zero.Or.Die's noob.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by brenz-brenz View Post
    No idea. You could try pushing the ISO up, but I have no idea how to do it. Someone off the sidewalk forum pushed his from 400 to 1600. I think it might be as simple as lying to the camera where you tell it what ISO you have.
    Well yeah, you can push like 3200 to 12800 in theory. But it would look so much worse than that.
    Last edited by Skatephotograpr; 11-04-2007 at 01:56 PM.

  20. #20

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    film grain > digital noise.

    i'll see if i can get this pinned.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by brenz-brenz View Post
    Hell no.



    Shot by a regular contributer to one of the UK mags. ISO 12500.
    Damn so minty.
    ...it's been a while

  22. #22
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    sticky?

  23. #23
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    Depth of Field

    Depth of field is what in the frame is in focus, and what isn't. A deeper DOF means more of your photo will be in focus, a shallow one means less will. There is a direct correlation between aperture and dof. It well be more shallow at a lower one, such as 2.8, and deeper at a larger one, such as 22. This can be used to the photographer's advantage, by putting the subject in focus, and blurring the surroundings to draw attention where it should be. The problem usually encountered by using a large dof is that shooting at a small aperture with everything in focus usually needs a freakishly slow shutter speed. Many times, people just have to come to a happy medium between speed and aperture.

    It's a kind of crappy explanation, but nothing was on there yet. I'll post some examples later today.

  24. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by suicidemachinesrock View Post
    Depth of Field

    Depth of field is what in the frame is in focus, and what isn't. A deeper DOF means more of your photo will be in focus, a shallow one means less will. There is a direct correlation between aperture and dof. It well be more shallow at a lower one, such as 2.8, and deeper at a larger one, such as 22. This can be used to the photographer's advantage, by putting the subject in focus, and blurring the surroundings to draw attention where it should be. The problem usually encountered by using a large dof is that shooting at a small aperture with everything in focus usually needs a freakishly slow shutter speed. Many times, people just have to come to a happy medium between speed and aperture.

    It's a kind of crappy explanation, but nothing was on there yet. I'll post some examples later today.
    Not all of that is really true.

    First off, more DOF doesn't mean more is in focus. There is one focal point in a photograph, thats it. It may appear that more is in focus but it reality it isn't.

    Another pretty key point is that subject distance from the camera is a huge influence on DOF. For instance, focusing on a mountain in the background will leave a lot of things in focus, while focusing on a flower a foot away will just leave leave the flower in focus.

    Another thing is that shooting F/2.8 on a 10mm lens will have a ton of DOF. Because DOF is also realated to focal length. So if you want just a little bit of DOF, and shooting at 35mm isn't putting the background out of focus or whatever, grab a 200mm or so lens and back up. The composition can remain the same but you will have quite a bit less DOF.

  25. #25
    SMR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skatephotograpr View Post
    Not all of that is really true.

    First off, more DOF doesn't mean more is in focus. There is one focal point in a photograph, thats it. It may appear that more is in focus but it reality it isn't.

    Another pretty key point is that subject distance from the camera is a huge influence on DOF. For instance, focusing on a mountain in the background will leave a lot of things in focus, while focusing on a flower a foot away will just leave leave the flower in focus.

    Another thing is that shooting F/2.8 on a 10mm lens will have a ton of DOF. Because DOF is also realated to focal length. So if you want just a little bit of DOF, and shooting at 35mm isn't putting the background out of focus or whatever, grab a 200mm or so lens and back up. The composition can remain the same but you will have quite a bit less DOF.
    Jesus Christ rereading that hurt me.

    I was on percocet all weekend from oral surgery and didn't even remember posting that untill Yuuki asked me to sticky this and I saw it.

    I'll fix it later.

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